The United States Military Academy is undergoing a holistic 15-20 year modernization effort, known as “USMA 2035”, to renovate, retrofit, and modernize its academic, military, and physical development facilities, capabilities, and infrastructure.  These efforts will enable us to execute our mission to meet the Army’s need by providing the most highly qualified, capable, and ready officers.  This effort will also ensure that USMA remains postured to sustain, modernize, and secure its position as the preeminent leader development institution in the world.

At the turn of the 20th Century, the Army and Congress decided that – after 100 years of operation, it was “time to rebuild the Academy.”  Beginning in 1902, the Academy would see three major renovation periods, each one roughly 30 years apart, with the last (and most recent) occurring in the mid-late 1960s. 

Each of those efforts involved major physical expansion – either in terms of simply expanding the footprint (as in 1902) or building new/larger infrastructure to accommodate expansion in the Corps of Cadets (which doubled in size in the 1930’s, and then again in the 1960’s to the 4,400 we know today). 

The following timeline shows the the major renovations that have taken place at the Academy from 1901 to present along with future renovation initiatives scheduled through 2035. You can also view the timeline in a separate browser tab by clicking here.

Timeline illustrating when updates have been made at West Point since 1901

Based on this historical trend, we are about 20 years overdue for a major modernization effort. The modernization wave is upon us once again. But while past efforts focused on physical expansion, this new effort –USMA 2035 – focuses on expanding capabilities, bringing West Point firmly into the 21st century, with an eye on the 22nd.

This holistic effort, which began in 2013 with the Cadet Barracks Upgrade Program and encompasses all aspects of our leader development mission, centers around four major lines of effort.

Four Lines of Effort

Click on each photo below to learn more about each line of effort.